Jonathas de Andrade builds his remarkable work through research and investigation. He conceived of 4 000 Disparos during the project Documento Latinamerica – Condução à Deriva (Driving Adrift – Latinamerica Document), in which De Andrade travelled through Uruguay, Argentina, Chile, Bolivia, Peru and Colombia, in a journey of territorial recognition of a Latin America he belongs to without feeling part of, because of the language, he says, but also “because of a political/historical disconnection I noticed in my generation with its past,” a sense of historical amnesia that he wanted to explore.

Shot in the streets of Buenos Aires, where he randomly captured thousands of anonymous male faces, 4 000 Disparos summons up the anxiety of the years of dictatorship. As a result of his choice of Super 8 black-and-white film, the images seem rather like a collection of archive photos and place the work in an ambiguous space between fiction and document, an ambiguity that is intensified by the rapid procession of faces and the shift in meaning between the Portuguese title 4 000 Disparos and the English title 4000 Shots.

Born in 1982 in Maceió, Jonathas de Andrade lives and works in Recife, a city on the northeast coast of Brazil. He has already seen his work presented in a number of group exhibitions. He took part in the 7th Mercosul Biennial, in Porto Alegre, in 2009; the 29th São Paulo Biennale, in 2010; the 12th Istanbul Biennial, in 2011; the second New Museum Triennial, titled The Ungovernables, in New York, in 2012; and, more recently, the exhibition of the twenty artists selected, from some 4,000 candidates, for the Future Generation Art Prize 2012 established by the Victor Pinchuk Foundation.